Posts Tagged ‘Lincoln in Peekskill’

Art and Photography of the Civil War

Saturday, October 12th, 2019

Saturday, October 12, 2019 • 2:00 PM – Admission $10.00, Members Free

Art & Photography of the Civil War

ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE CIVIL WAR will focus on the effects of the Civil War on American landscape and genre painting, and on the new (at the time) medium of photography.

We will look at the large range of works created before (slavery, racism), during (lives of soldiers, battles), and following the Civil War war (Negro struggles, reconstruction). We will look at work by some of America’s finest artists including Hudson River School painters like Frederick Church (metaphorical paintings of the War) and Sanford Gifford (a soldier during the Civil War – lives of the soldiers); genre painters, William Sidney Mount and Eastman Johnson (lives and struggles of slaves); journalists like Winslow Homer whose works relating to the lives of soldiers were published in Harper’s Weekly; and finally the photographs bringing Abraham Lincoln to vivid life as well as the horrors of war by famed photographers Mathew Brady, Alexander Gardner and George Barnard.

We will address how these works of art not only unleashed historical events of a great historical moment, but also wrought great changes in the nation’s visual culture and character.

Presenter: Cynthia Andersen

Cynthia Andersen was a New York City school teacher and special education supervisor.  She earned her B.A. from Hunter College, majoring in History with a concentration in Early American Culture. She also earned a Master’s degree in Education and Art History and a School Administration Degree from Queens College.  Cynthia, an amateur painter, has been researching, writing and lecturing about the Hudson River School of Painting for more than ten years. She expanded her Hudson River School of Painting to 19th Century American Art which includes Luminism, Art and Photography of the Civil War and American Impressionism.  Her lectures have been seen by the various Sloop Clubs; affiliates of the Clearwater, up and down the Hudson River, as well as MALFA (Material Archives and Laboratory for Archaeology), the Scarsdale Women’s’ Organization, the Scarsdale Adult School, the UFT (United Federation of Teachers in NYC) and Westchester Community College’s Mainstream Program. Most recently Westchester Community College made Cynthia an adjunct teacher of art history.

Opening Weekend • 19th Century Photographs

Saturday, April 21st, 2018

Join us as we explore the wonder of 19th Century photography through the Carte de Visite. We are excited to have two expert presenters on the topic who will share many images from their unique and extensive collections.


Doors will open at 1:00 each day with the presentations to start at 2 PM.

Admission $10.00 (Free for Members and Children 12 and Under)


Saturday, April 21, 2018

“One Family’s Journey During the Time of Lincoln”

Historian and Researcher Lance Ingmire will tell  the story of the photographer FW Ingmire’s collection of Lincoln related CdVs and photos, and the connection of the Ingmire family to the Civil War, including his research on the 95th New York Infantry. Replete with artifacts and original images.

Presenter: Lance Ingmire

Lance is a passionate researcher and collector of the Civil War era, with special emphasis on the 95th New York and the 115th New York.

He has more than 14 relatives who served in the Union Army during the Civil War.  He has been painstakingly writing the regimental history of the 95th New York and has made over 150 trips to the National Archives in Washington, DC for research as well as numerous field trips to many battlefields where the 95th was engaged, especially Gettysburg, Pa.

He retired in 2005, at age 55 after a carrier in the insurance world and moved to his home town of Saratoga Springs, NY.  In retirement he has served as President of the Friends of US Grant Cottage, (Grant’s last residence),  President of the Friends of the NY State Military Museum and organized the Saratoga Civil War Encampment which educated and entertained the residents for 7 years. He also served as Chair of the New York State Sesquicentennial Committee of the Civil War. This coming year he will serve as President of the Saratoga Springs Lions Club.  He co-authored and was business manager for “The Centennial History of Saratoga Springs, NY”, published in 2015 and authored the chapter on “Saratoga During the Civil War”.

His family connections to the Civil War era are most interesting and will be discussed during his lecture.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

“Cardomania! The Rise and Fall of the Carte de Visite in Civil War America”

The Civil War Generation was the first to grow up with photography. This transformative medium made it possible for Americans from all walks of life to preserve their own likeness, a privilege once reserved only for the wealthy. During photography’s early years, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes ruled the portrait world. Then, on the eve of the Civil War, a curious new format landed in America—the carte de visite. After hostilities began, hundreds of thousands of citizen soldiers and sailors posed for their likenesses. Countless millions of photographs were produced. Significant numbers of these most intimate and personal artifacts survive today. Some are finding a place among the iconic images of the war. Join Ron Coddington, author of four books of collected Civil War portraits and editor and publisher of Military Images magazine, as he tells the story of the rise and fall of the carte de visite—and what became of them.

Presenter: Ron Coddington

While other kids in his Middlesex, New Jersey, neighborhood were collecting baseball cards, 14-year-old Ron Coddington was browsing flea markets looking for old photographs. Little did he realize after he purchased his first photo in 1977 that collecting historic images would become a lifelong pursuit. He originally collected various formats of vernacular photography dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. Over time, he focused his collection on Civil War era cartes de visite, a paper format popular during the 1860s.

From 2001-2016, he authored Faces of War, a regular column in the Civil War News. Each month, Ron profiled a soldier, and each was illustrated with an original, wartime carte de visite photograph. His subjects were enlisted men and non-commissioned officers, and officers below the rank of colonel. Ron believes that appreciating the role of the volunteer soldier is key to understanding America’s greatest conflict. He writes, “The history of the Civil War is the stories of its soldiers and sailors.”

In 2004, a collection of columns became part of Ron’s first book, Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories. A companion volume, Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories, followed in 2008. Four years later, the publication of African American Faces of War: An Album marked the third book in the series. A fourth volume, Faces of the Civil War Navies: An Album of Union and Confederate Sailors, was released in 2016. All are published by The Johns Hopkins University Press. His next volume will profile the lives and contributions of nurses and other caregivers.

Ron also wrote for the New York Times Disunion series from 2011-2014. His contributions documented the experiences of the enlisted men and line officers who participated in the Civil War.

In 2013, he became editor and publisher of Military Images, a quarterly magazine dedicated to showcasing, interpreting and preserving early American photographs of soldiers and sailors.

Ron has participated as a speaker at numerous Civil War-related events, and at meetings for round tables and other organizations.

A 1985 graduate of the University of Georgia, Ron lives in Arlington, Virginia, with his wife, Anne, and pug Bella. He is currently Editor, Visuals, for The Chronicle of Higher Education and The Chronicle of Philanthropy.

NY and the Lincoln Specials: Lincoln’s Pre-Inaugural and Funeral Trains Cross the Empire State

Saturday, November 2nd, 2019

Saturday, November 2, 2019 • 2:00 PM – Admission $10.00, Members Free

New York and the Lincoln Specials: The President’s Pre-Inaugural and Funeral Trains Cross the Empire State

Abraham Lincoln’s presidency was bookended by a pair of dramatic railroad trips through the state of New York. His first term began with a pre-inaugural railway tour—his second ended with a funeral train. Each was a five-day crossing of the Empire State. These two journeys allowed thousands of ordinary Americans first to celebrate, and later to mourn, the great president, and became indelibly etched in the memories of those who had the opportunity to stand along parade route. Drawing on newspaper accounts, memoirs and diaries, Joe Collea’s Program (and book) brings to life the two epic and unique moments in both New York’s and the nation’s history.

BOOK SALE AND SIGNING TO FOLLOW PRESENTATION

Presenter: Joe D. Collea, Jr.

After 47 years in public education as a teacher and administrator, Joe Collea recently retired. He now devotes his time to research, related-travel, and writing. His first two books—The First Vermont Cavalry in the Civil War, A History and New York and the Lincoln Specials: The President’s Pre-Inaugural and Funeral Trains Cross the Empire State—were published by McFarland. He is currently finishing two other manuscripts: one is about George Custer and the 1st Vermont Cavalry in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864-1865; and the other is a history of his hometown of Ilion, New York, where he served as a village trustee and then mayor. He also has several magazine articles to his credit, two of which have appeared in New York Archives magazine.

Joe was a graduate of Ilion Junior-Senior High School—where he eventually became the principal–has three degrees from SUNY Albany, and did post-graduate work under a Fulbright Scholarship at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, and through a graduate scholarship at Syracuse University.

He currently shuttles his time among residences in Ilion and Scotia, New York, and Cape Coral, Florida.

The 5th NY Infantry “Duryée’s” Zouaves

Thursday, October 18th, 2018

Thursday, October 18, 2018 – $10.00/person • Members Free

The 5th NY Infantry “Duryée’s” Zouaves

The 5th New York Volunteer Infantry, also known as “Duryée’s Zouaves”, was a volunteer infantry regiment of the Union Army, during the American Civil War, led by Colonel Abram Duryée. Modeled, like other Union and Confederate infantry regiments, on the French Zouaves of Crimean War fame, its tactics and uniforms were different from those of the standard infantry.

Presenter: Bill Wienecke

A retired history teacher of 35 years from the Somers Central School District in Somers, New York, Bill Wienecke is a “living history” re-enactor whose portrayals include; General George Washington, Revolutionary Continental Line 5th N.Y. infantry, 3rd Westchester, N.Y. Militia, French and Indian War period Verplank’s N.Y. Provincials as well as a living history portrayal of an officer and private in the famous Civil War regiments; Duryee’s Zouaves 5th N.Y. Volunteers Co. D \ 95th N.Y. Warren Riffles, of which he is the living history organization’s president.

Bill has taken part in historic re-enactments including anniversaries of: The 225th Battle of Yorktown, Virginia, the 225th Battle of Saratoga, the 150th Battle of Gettysburg, the 150th Battle of Second Bull Run, the 250th Battle of Fort Niagara and the 250th Battle of Fort Carillon reenactments, along with numerous others historic commemorations. He has done presentations as “His Excellency” at Washington’s Headquarters in Newburgh, the Purdy House in White Plains, Fort Ticonderoga and at various schools, scout and DAR gatherings.

Bill graduated from Cortland State College in 1977 and has a Master’s degree in history from Iona College in 1981. He is a 2010 graduate of the Mount Vernon Summer Teacher Institute. He was awarded “Teacher of the Month” by radio station WHUD in 2011. He is the 2011 recipient for “Outstanding Living History Program” awarded by Colonel Philip Ryan, Commander of the decorated United States Military Special Operations 160th S.O.A.R. Night Stalkers. He was awarded the 2013 “United States National Citizenship Education Teacher Post Recognition Award” from Somers VFW Post 8213. He received Town of Somers recognition for “commitment to the students of Somers” with a Proclamation of “Bill Wienecke Day in Somers” May 23, 2014. He is recipient of the 2015 National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution’s “Bronze Good Citizenship Medal”, and in 2017 was awarded the “Old Bet Award” for promoting regional history from the Somers Historical Society and in 2017 also received N.Y.S. Senate Resolution No. 2176 in recognition of 10 years of organizing the Somers Middle School Living History Day promoting history and honoring Somers service personnel.

NY Zouaves

Elmer Ellsworth and the 11th New York Fire Zouaves

Thursday, December 13th, 2018

Thursday, December 13, 2018 – $10.00/person • Members Free

Elmer Ellsworth and the 11th New York Fire Zouaves

The famed Fire Zouaves raised by celebrity Elmer Ellsworth had more than their share of mischief. Even after the death of Ellsworth, they were counted on to carry the field at the Battle of Bull Run. The 11th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment was organized in New York City in May1861 as a Zouave regiment, known for its unusual dress and drill style, by Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth, a personal friend of President Abraham Lincoln. Drawn from the ranks of the city’s many volunteer fire companies, the unit was known alternately as the Ellsworth Zouaves, First Fire Zouaves, First Regiment New York Zouaves, and U.S. National Guards. The unit was among the first to occupy a Confederate state when it captured Alexandria Virginia on May 24, 1861, less than 24 hours after the Commonwealth seceded from the Union.  The regiment suffered extensive casualties during the First Battle of Bull Run. Sent back to New York City in May 1862, the regiment was mustered out of service on June 2, 1862. There were several attempts to reorganize the regiment through the summer of 1863, and many new enlistees were involved in suppressing the New York Draft Riots, but those efforts failed and the enlistees were transferred to the 17th New York Infantry regiment.

Did they live up to expectations?  Find out the history and story of this celebrated unit.

Presenter: Pat Schroeder

Civil War Author/Historian — Patrick A. Schroeder was born January 1, 1968, at Fort Belvoir, VA.  In the spring of 1990, he graduated Cum Laude with a B.S. in Historical Park Administration from Shepherd College, Shepherdstown, WV.  He has a M.A. in Civil War History from Virginia Tech.  From the summer of 1986-1993, Patrick worked as a seasonal living history interpreter at Appomattox Court House National Historical Park.  In 1993, he wrote Thirty Myths About Lee’s Surrender, which is currently in its twelfth printing.   From 1994–1999, he was employed at Red Hill, the Patrick Henry National Memorial.  Patrick has written, edited and/or contributed to more than twenty-five Civil War titles including:  More Myths About Lee’s Surrender; The Confederate Cemetery at Appomattox; Recollections and Reminiscences of Old Appomattox; Images of America:  Appomattox County; Tar Heels; Sailor’s Creek:  General Custis Lee Captured with Controversy; Civil War Soldier Life:  In Camp and Battle; A Duryee Zouave; We Came To Fight: A History of the 5th NY Veteran Vol. Inf., Duryee’s Zouaves; Campaigns of the 146th Regiment New York State Volunteers; Pennsylvania Bucktails; The Bloody 85th; The Life of General Ely S. Parker: Least Grand Sachem of the Iroquois and Grant’s Military Secretary; Appomattox County; and With the 11th New York Fire Zouaves: In Camp, Battle and Prison.  Patrick resides in Lynchburg, VA, and has worked as an independent researcher, author, historian, and tour guide.  He has served as the Historian at Appomattox Court House National Historical Park since 2002.  In an effort to protect sites relevant to the Appomattox Campaign, Patrick has set up the “Appomattox Fund” with the Civil War Trust, to save land important to the climatic events of April 1865.

Ellsworth3

Opening Weekend • 19th Century Photographs Copy

Saturday, April 21st, 2018

Join us as we explore the wonder of 19th Century photography through the Carte de Visite. We are excited to have two expert presenters on the topic who will share many images from their unique and extensive collections.


Doors will open at 1:00 each day with the presentations to start at 2 PM.

Admission $10.00 (Free for Members and Children 12 and Under)


Saturday, April 21, 2018

“One Family’s Journey During the Time of Lincoln”

Historian and Researcher Lance Ingmire will tell  the story of the photographer FW Ingmire’s collection of Lincoln related CdVs and photos, and the connection of the Ingmire family to the Civil War, including his research on the 95th New York Infantry. Replete with artifacts and original images.

Presenter: Lance Ingmire

Lance is a passionate researcher and collector of the Civil War era, with special emphasis on the 95th New York and the 115th New York.

He has more than 14 relatives who served in the Union Army during the Civil War.  He has been painstakingly writing the regimental history of the 95th New York and has made over 150 trips to the National Archives in Washington, DC for research as well as numerous field trips to many battlefields where the 95th was engaged, especially Gettysburg, Pa.

He retired in 2005, at age 55 after a carrier in the insurance world and moved to his home town of Saratoga Springs, NY.  In retirement he has served as President of the Friends of US Grant Cottage, (Grant’s last residence),  President of the Friends of the NY State Military Museum and organized the Saratoga Civil War Encampment which educated and entertained the residents for 7 years. He also served as Chair of the New York State Sesquicentennial Committee of the Civil War. This coming year he will serve as President of the Saratoga Springs Lions Club.  He co-authored and was business manager for “The Centennial History of Saratoga Springs, NY”, published in 2015 and authored the chapter on “Saratoga During the Civil War”.

His family connections to the Civil War era are most interesting and will be discussed during his lecture.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

“Cardomania! The Rise and Fall of the Carte de Visite in Civil War America”

The Civil War Generation was the first to grow up with photography. This transformative medium made it possible for Americans from all walks of life to preserve their own likeness, a privilege once reserved only for the wealthy. During photography’s early years, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes ruled the portrait world. Then, on the eve of the Civil War, a curious new format landed in America—the carte de visite. After hostilities began, hundreds of thousands of citizen soldiers and sailors posed for their likenesses. Countless millions of photographs were produced. Significant numbers of these most intimate and personal artifacts survive today. Some are finding a place among the iconic images of the war. Join Ron Coddington, author of four books of collected Civil War portraits and editor and publisher of Military Images magazine, as he tells the story of the rise and fall of the carte de visite—and what became of them.

Presenter: Ron Coddington

While other kids in his Middlesex, New Jersey, neighborhood were collecting baseball cards, 14-year-old Ron Coddington was browsing flea markets looking for old photographs. Little did he realize after he purchased his first photo in 1977 that collecting historic images would become a lifelong pursuit. He originally collected various formats of vernacular photography dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. Over time, he focused his collection on Civil War era cartes de visite, a paper format popular during the 1860s.

From 2001-2016, he authored Faces of War, a regular column in the Civil War News. Each month, Ron profiled a soldier, and each was illustrated with an original, wartime carte de visite photograph. His subjects were enlisted men and non-commissioned officers, and officers below the rank of colonel. Ron believes that appreciating the role of the volunteer soldier is key to understanding America’s greatest conflict. He writes, “The history of the Civil War is the stories of its soldiers and sailors.”

In 2004, a collection of columns became part of Ron’s first book, Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories. A companion volume, Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories, followed in 2008. Four years later, the publication of African American Faces of War: An Album marked the third book in the series. A fourth volume, Faces of the Civil War Navies: An Album of Union and Confederate Sailors, was released in 2016. All are published by The Johns Hopkins University Press. His next volume will profile the lives and contributions of nurses and other caregivers.

Ron also wrote for the New York Times Disunion series from 2011-2014. His contributions documented the experiences of the enlisted men and line officers who participated in the Civil War.

In 2013, he became editor and publisher of Military Images, a quarterly magazine dedicated to showcasing, interpreting and preserving early American photographs of soldiers and sailors.

Ron has participated as a speaker at numerous Civil War-related events, and at meetings for round tables and other organizations.

A 1985 graduate of the University of Georgia, Ron lives in Arlington, Virginia, with his wife, Anne, and pug Bella. He is currently Editor, Visuals, for The Chronicle of Higher Education and The Chronicle of Philanthropy.

Annual Fundraiser with the Bob Getz Band

Saturday, November 3rd, 2018

Come celebrate another successful season and help us raise funds for 2019!

Also included:
“A Taste of Peekskill”
Many local restaurants will be providing sample dishes from their popular menus.

Lincoln Depot Museum, 10 S. Water Street, Peekskill, NY 10566
Admission: $75.00 per person • $55 for LDM Members

• Silent Auction     • Sponsorships Available

Platinum Sponsor: $1000 • Gold Sponsor $500

Pay online or by mail below:

Annual Fundraiser with the Class Action Band

Saturday, November 18th, 2017

Come celebrate another successful season and help us raise funds for 2018!

Also included:
“A Taste of Peekskill”
Many local restaurants will be providing sample dishes from their popular menus.

Lincoln Depot Museum, 10 S. Water Street, Peekskill, NY 10566
Admission: $75.00 per person • $55 for LDM Members

• Silent Auction     • Sponsorships Available

Platinum Sponsor: $1000 • Gold Sponsor $500

Lincoln Depot Museum Opening Weekend 2019

Friday, April 26th, 2019

Friday, April 26, 2019 • 7:30 PM – $5 Admission or $20 for Full Weekend Pass

Grant’s Friendship with Abraham Lincoln

 

US Grant first-person impressionist Kenneth Serfass discusses the General’s close relationship with President Abraham Lincoln.

President Lincoln had faith in Ulysses S. Grant when few people did. During the Vicksburg Campaign, calls went out for the President to dismiss Grant because he had bogged down “somewhere in Mississippi”.  Mr. Lincoln later said in Grant’s defense, “I really believe I am the only friend Grant has left. Grant advises me that he will take Vicksburg by the Fourth of July, and I believe he will do it; and he shall have the chance.”

The criticisms came in the form of letters, newspaper editorials, and delegations of irate citizens calling on Lincoln in person. The editor of the Cincinnati Gazette wrote, ‘Our noble army of the Mississippi is being wasted by the foolish, drunken, stupid Grant, He cannot organize or control or fight an army. I have no personal feeling about it; but I know he is an ass.'”  Lincoln’s response, “I can’t spare this man, he fights”.  Colonel Absalom H. Markland, a Washington postal official connected to Grant’s army made note: “Other friends may have wavered in their friendship for General Grant, and even recommended his removal from command, but Abraham Lincoln was faithful to General Grant through evil and good report.”

Because Grant began his civil war career with victories in battle, he soon was very much in Lincoln’s focus as a successful commander.  Lincoln endured criticism of all sorts about Grant, but had faith as to the outcome of each battle and campaign.  The Chicago Journal once published this exchange with a visitor who asked: “When will the army move?” Responded the President: “Ask General Grant.” The visitor replied: “General Grant will not tell me.” Responded the President: “Neither will he tell me.”

The two men sustained each other for what was to come before the surrender of confederate armies, and that shared responsibility built a profound bond between two people, and like-minded men regarding fairness and humanity towards a vanquished foe.   It’s not always told in battle reports and dispatches, but the stories of friends go much deeper sometimes.  This encounter will be a rare chance to see inside that friendship.

Kenneth J. Serfass, Gunnery Sgt USMC, retired
(as Ulysses S. Grant)

Gunnery Sgt Kenneth J. Serfass was born in Bethlehem, PA on June 18th, 1966.  He joined the USMC in 1984 and his final tour was with the First Marine Division Band during Operation Iraqi Freedom and retired from the Marine Corps in July of 2004 to become a music teacher.

Ken WAS a civil war reenactor and now is a first-person impressionist with nearly fifty years of study of his childhood hero, US Grant.  He now works as a full-time professional living historian portraying Ulysses S. Grant, presenting between 11 and as many as 23 appearances each month between February and November each year as his work season.

Ken began appearing publically as General Grant in 2009 while living in San Diego CA, even then speaking at events across the country and he presents in as many venues as are relevant to the life of Grant.  From horseback tours and rail road excursion rides, at living history and roundtable events to public libraries on a regular basis across many eastern and southern states, and annually in Southern California at Huntington Beach’s Civil War Days over Labor Day weekend, Ken is established firmly on both coasts.

He has appeared at Pamplin Park near Petersburg VA, and at several national park sites on an annual basis.  In 2015 he was invited to join The Federal Generals Corps, a living history organization hosting first person impressions of many of the most well-known Union generals in the American civil war, to be their “Ulysses S. Grant.”  This past July he presented at Petersburg NPS for the Crater Commemoration, and the following day at City Point NPS, Grant’s war time Virginia headquarters.  They now have invited him back to make this an annual occurrence.

He has spoken on Grant’s Vicksburg Campaign to the Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Association to develop broader civil war study among their guides.  He is the only Grant impressionist to present his own topical programs at the General Grant National Memorial, in New York City, presenting first person public interactive addresses, as General and also as President, and has developed Junior Ranger programs for NPS, bringing America’s youth closer to history.

Entertaining and educational, the spectrum of venues includes schools, all sorts of service and history clubs, as well as museums, and business groups seeking leadership training and inspiration.  Ken’s work has generated a great following of supporters and others who share his love or American history and the attributes of positive role models throughout our national past.  Many are happy to refer him to others so they too can talk to history and share in our rich heritage.

It is with a profound honor that he tells the story of one of America’s greatest military leaders and Ken takes it very seriously to reaffirm Grant’s place of honor among the most respected people of our nation’s history.  His passion for the subject is evident in his presentation, and it is hard not to be affected by his enthusiasm for his subject and believe that you’ve met US Grant in living history.

Saturday, April 27, 2019 • 12:00 PM – $10 for the day (includes admission to all Saturday presentations) or $20 for Full Weekend Pass.

Elmer Ellsworth and Abraham Lincoln

Presented by – Civil War Author/Historian — Patrick A. Schroeder

Perhaps the most famous non-political celebrity in the country at the time of his death/murder, Elmer Ellsworth originally from Mechanicville, NY, started the “Zouave Craze in America.”  This program will discuss the origin of Zouaves; Ellsworth’s life prior to the time he became associated with Lincoln; his relationship with the Lincoln family; working and campaigning for Lincoln, the journey to Washington; his raising of the 11th NY Fire Zouaves; his untimely death in Alexandria, VA; and his funeral at the White House.

Saturday, April 27, 2019 • 2:00 PM – $10 for the day (includes admission to all Saturday presentations) or $20 for Full Weekend Pass.

Lincoln and the Surrender at Appomattox

Presented by – Civil War Author/Historian — Patrick A. Schroeder

The program will discuss Lincoln’s meeting with Generals Sherman and Grant prior to the Appomattox Campaign and his influence on the surrender terms.  Details about how the surrender meeting came about; incidents; personalities; primary source accounts; and details of the meeting that effectively closed the war and reunited the Nation will be covered, as well as the presence of Robert Lincoln at the McLean House on April 9, 1865.

Saturday, April 27, 2019 • 3:00 PM

Zouaves and Peekskill Connections

Presented by – Civil War Author/Historian — Patrick A. Schroeder

Patrick Schroeder, expert on Zouave units of the Civil War discusses the connections of Peekskill and the units that enlisted area residents.

Sunday, April 28, 2019 • 1:00 PM – $10 for the day (includes admission to all Sunday presentations).

Lincoln and the Surrender at Appomattox

Presented by – Civil War Author/Historian — Patrick A. Schroeder

The program will discuss Lincoln’s meeting with Generals Sherman and Grant prior to the Appomattox Campaign and his influence on the surrender terms.  Details about how the surrender meeting came about; incidents; personalities; primary source accounts; and details of the meeting that effectively closed the war and reunited the Nation will be covered, as well as the presence of Robert Lincoln at the McLean House on April 9, 1865.

Sunday, April 28, 2019 • 2:00 PM – (Outside on the LDM grounds).

Zouaves, America’s Forgotten Soldiers

Presented by – Civil War Author/Historian — Patrick A. Schroeder

A power point with more than 100 photographs of Zouaves both North and South.  Discusses the origins of Zouaves in North Africa, French Zouaves distinguished exploits in the Crimean War and in Italy, Elmer Ellsworth and “Zouaves craze” in America.  Slides demonstrate various styles of American Zouave uniforms.  Brief capsule histories on several famous Zouave units.  Reproduction uniforms brought for display.  Details of this unique uniform explained.

Sunday, April 28, 2019 • 1:00-4:00 PM – Included with Admission

General Grant Returns to the Depot

General US Grant (Ken Serfass) returns to the Lincoln Depot Museum to be available on site for small group or individual discussions and photographs.

Encampment on Grounds All Weekend!

Encampment will feature several Zouave units including 5th NY Duryee’s Zouaves, Cos. A & D, 15th NY Cavalry and 11th Connecticut Vols., with live firings, bayonet and arms drills, camp life and Grant and Lincoln’s review of the troops.  And MORE!

Civil War Author/Historian — Patrick A. Schroeder was born January 1, 1968, at Fort Belvoir, VA.  In the spring of 1990, he graduated Cum Laude with a B.S. in Historical Park Administration from Shepherd College, Shepherdstown, WV.  He has a M.A. in Civil War History from Virginia Tech.  From the summer of 1986-1993, Patrick worked as a seasonal living history interpreter at Appomattox Court House National Historical Park.  In 1993, he wrote Thirty Myths About Lee’s Surrender, which is currently in its twelfth printing.   From 1994–1999, he was employed at Red Hill, the Patrick Henry National Memorial.  Patrick has written, edited and/or contributed to more than twenty-five Civil War titles including:  More Myths About Lee’s Surrender; The Confederate Cemetery at Appomattox; Recollections and Reminiscences of Old Appomattox; Images of America:  Appomattox County; Tar Heels; Sailor’s Creek:  General Custis Lee Captured with Controversy; Civil War Soldier Life:  In Camp and Battle; A Duryee Zouave; We Came To Fight: A History of the 5th NY Veteran Vol. Inf., Duryee’s Zouaves; Campaigns of the 146th Regiment New York State Volunteers; Pennsylvania Bucktails; The Bloody 85th; The Life of General Ely S. Parker: Least Grand Sachem of the Iroquois and Grant’s Military Secretary; Appomattox County; and With the 11th New York Fire Zouaves: In Camp, Battle and Prison.  Patrick resides in Lynchburg, VA, and has worked as an independent researcher, author, historian, and tour guide.  He has served as the Historian at Appomattox Court House National Historical Park since 2002.  In an effort to protect sites relevant to the Appomattox Campaign, Patrick has set up the “Appomattox Fund” with the Civil War Trust, to save land important to the climatic events of April 1865.

Civil War Intelligence

Saturday, May 18th, 2019

Saturday, May 18, 2019 • 2:00 PM – Admission $10.00, Members Free

Civil War Intelligence & The International Spy Museum

 

Part I – Civil War Intelligence:

This presentation will focus broadly on an overview on the various intelligence, tradecraft, techniques and procedures used by the North and the South during the American Civil War. These include aged techniques like code-breaking, deception and surveillance, as well as newer practices like wire-tapping and overheard reconnaissance. I will also discuss how the two sides collected and utilized this information.

Part II – The New International Spy Museum in Washington, DC:

I will provide an overview of The New International Spy Museum’s purpose-built new facility is located in Washington DC’s L’Enfant Plaza, a short walk between the National Mall and The Wharf. The Museum will explore the many roles individuals play in spying and intelligence work – from the agents and their handlers in the field who collect intelligence or carry out covert operations, to the technical wizards who envision and create the gadgets that support them. Digging into its trove of intelligence stories, the Museum showcases a diverse cast, from the women whose analytical prowess facilitated the capture of Osama Bin Laden to James Lafayette, the African American spy whose intelligence reports helped George Washington clinch victory in the American Revolution, and many others, famous, infamous, and unknown. Through this exploration of people, missions, and artifacts from across the globe—from ancient Greece and China, to Cold War Cuba and Vietnam, to cyberspace and social media— these new exhibitions will present a comprehensive look at how spying has shaped our world and continues to do so.

COL Christopher P. Costa (Ret), Executive Director, International Spy Museum, Washington DC

COL Christopher P. Costa, USA, (Ret)
, is a former career U.S. Army Intelligence officer. Mr. Costa served as the Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Counterterrorism on the National Security Council (NSC), at The White House from 2017-2018. At the NSC, he was responsible for coordinating counterterrorism policy and strategy as well as U.S. hostage recovery activities. Mr. Costa had 34 years of progressive national security experience for the U.S. Government and well-documented success in intelligence, counterintelligence, policy, and special operations. In May 2013, Mr. Costa was inducted into USSOCOM’s Commando Hall of Honor for extraordinary and enduring service to Special Operations Forces. Mr. Costa joined the International Spy Museum in 2018, as the Executive Director where he plays a leading role in building on its extraordinary success as a Washington, DC attraction. He speaks responsibly on current counterterrorism and intelligence issues.

International Spy Museum, Washington, DC